2019 Spring Conference Session Descriptions

W-1, Developing Youth Wellness in a Residential Setting

Colleen Daisley, RN, Director of Nursing, HarborCreek Youth Services
Neil Glover, Child & Adolescent Program Manager, Community Care Behavioral Health
Anthony Lucas, Manager of Quality Improvement, Allegheny County HealthChoices, Inc.
Jim Williams, Compliance Officer, HarborCreek Youth Services

Our system of care has gradually been shifting from segregated, treatment silos to a comprehensive, individualized, holistic approach. However, making this cultural shift in a provider setting requires support from leadership; a willingness to explore possible programmatic changes; and an innovative mindset for creating positive, clinical outcomes. This session will focus on a value-based purchasing (VBP) activity that involved residential treatment facility providers monitoring youth’s body mass index (BMI) and creating targeted interventions for those individuals with an elevated BMI score. The presenters will provide an overview of the VBP model, how this influenced organizational culture, and outcome measures. Participants will learn how to implement provider interventions and have the opportunity to participate in a case study activity related to wellness treatment plans.



W-2, Family First: Prevention Services Act: State Updates on Family First Implementation - What Providers Need to Know about State Implementation, Congregate Care Restrictions, and Prevention Services Funding


Gloria Gilligan, Director, Bureau of Budget and Fiscal Support
Roseann Perry, Director, Bureau of Child and Family Services, Department of Human Services Office of Children, Youth and Families

In this session, attendees will hear the latest news from the Office of Children, Youth and Families on Pennsylvania’s plans relating to Family First Implementation. Topics will include federal and state guidance on the congregate care restrictions, specialized settings, prevention services funding, evidence-based practices, the federal Clearinghouse, and foster family home licensing. Bring your questions!



W-3, Understanding the Impact of Early Trauma: Building the Foundation for Trauma Informed Care


Faye L. Hall, Family Based Therapist
Jeff Merkert, Family Based Therapist, Jewish Family Service

Trauma occurs in various ways to people of all ages. The standard in treatment, trauma-informed care, will be more effective with an experiential understanding of early trauma (trauma from domestic violence, parental substance abuse and mental health disorders, abuse, neglect, attachment disruptions, medical issues, etc.). Infants (pre-postnatal) and toddlers’ experiences are often dismissed and minimized. The impact of early trauma is significant and changes the trajectory of development with lasting effects on a person’s future.



W–4, Sex Trafficking and Trauma: Legal Issues, Advocacy and the Survivor Perspective


Jamie Pizzi, Esq.
Sarah Robinson Barbera, Esq., Institute to Address Commercial Sexual Exploitation
Tammy McDonnell

In 2014, Pennsylvania enacted the Commonwealth’s first comprehensive anti-trafficking statute, and last year, Act 130, the Safe Harbor Law, created new protections and supports for children of human trafficking and sexual exploitation. Among other things, the law shields children from prosecution for crimes their abusers forced them to commit and establishes a new fund for victim services. These critical protections can help victims restore their lives and reduce some of the collateral consequences of their experiences, however, victims and survivors need legal assistance to use the legal remedies available to them. This training will explain the federal and state laws related to commercial sexual exploitation and human trafficking and discuss the ways in which this issue is policed and addressed throughout the Commonwealth. We will examine the legal remedies available to trafficking survivors and equip participants with practice tips to support survivors at any stage of the process. Additionally, this training will explore the concept of trauma, providing participants with guidance on how to incorporate trauma-informed techniques into their respective work as well other best practices for working with the survivor population. Finally, a survivor will share her personal experiences, how the legal process worked for her, and suggestions for mitigating trauma.



W–5, Needs Based Budgeting Overview and Working Effectively with Counties


Gloria Gilligan
Roseann Perry, Office of Children, Youth and Families
Kim Young, MSW, LSW, CCTP, Vice President
Terry Clark, President, The Bair Foundation MPA, Administrator

York County Office of Children, Youth and Families County Children and Youth agencies submit their Needs-Based Plan and Budget requests to the Department of Human Services by August 15th each year. These submissions are reviewed by the Department to determine allocations of funds and directly affect the Department’s requests for funding. But providers must work with counties far in advance of that date to communicate program and funding needs. Our speakers will share information on how the process works at both the state and county level, how providers can effectively work with counties to provide information and request funding in a timely manner, strategies that have worked to get providers’ requests and information into county submissions, and more.



W–6, Measuring Clinical Effectiveness in Community Mental Health


Steven Galambos, MS, BSL
Jessica Mastrangelo, MA, LPC, NCC, Outpatient Clinical Supervisor
Deborah Luckey, PsyD, Post-Doctoral Fellow/Outpatient Therapist
Molly Stubbs, LPC, Clinical Case Manager, Devereux

Advanced Behavioral Health Systems for collecting program-wide clinical outcomes are essential for evaluating the effectiveness of clinical services in community mental health clinics. This is especially true given the breadth of children served and the resources and cost needed to provide such services. The current presentation will describe a model for utilizing standardized clinical measures to evaluate program-wide clinical effectiveness in a children’s community mental health clinic in Southeastern, PA. In addition, this outcome data is utilized to assess individualized outcomes for clients and their families, and to provide specific feedback regarding areas for further refinement and enhancement. Program outcomes reviewed will include general outpatient, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, Trauma-Focused-CBT, Parent Child Interaction Therapy, and Intensive Family Coaching.



W–7, Modern Day Social Work Ethics, Part One


June Fisher, LSW, Dynamic Training Solutions

Attend one or both parts of this two-part workshop to review the significant updates to the NASW Code of Ethics. In both sessions you will practice responding to ethical situations. Part One will review ethical situations that may arise between administrators, supervisors, staff and other providers/county agencies. Part Two will review situations that may occur related to using technology in the workplace. Both sessions are appropriate for all levels of staff (direct service, supervisor and administrator).



W–8, Teen Technology Usage Trends and Mental Health Sharing through Social Media, Part One


Ryan Klingensmith, Founder, Shape the Sky

Life for a teenager is vastly different than it was ten years ago. Kids today have unlimited access to information, apps and websites that can be wonderfully helpful, but also lead to concerning behaviors if adults don’t have the knowledge to teach young people how to behave responsibly in this new cyber-playground. Kids have the knowledge to use technology, but sometimes lack the wisdom to use it responsibly. Adults have the wisdom to be responsible users, but sometimes lack the knowledge to use technology. My goal is to connect knowledge with wisdom. Attendees will learn about popular teen apps and social platforms, including some that are hidden from adults, cyberbullying, oversharing, and other behavior concerns, and effective intervention/prevention practices when working with youth.



W-9, Family First Prevention Services Act: Evidence-Based Practices


Kira Fatherree, Allegheny County Department of Human Services

The Family First Prevention Services Act will make significant changes to the Title IV-E federal foster care funding stream for evidence-based prevention services for children and youth at risk of entering foster care. Hear from Kira Fatherree, Allegheny County Department of Human Services, about the current status of Family First Prevention Services Act implementation, including evidence-based programs in Pennsylvania, resources needed to implement and sustain evidence-based programs, challenges and opportunities.



W-10, An Accountability Culture: Using Trauma Informed Principles


Lisa Schiller, LCSW, Executive Director, MHY Family Services
Jennifer Marsteller, Assistant Director, MHY Family Services

Creating an accountability culture is critical for strong performance, outcomes and employee retention. Join this session to learn how managers and supervisors can improve their skills in working with their employees and peers when expectations are not met. This session will offer practical suggestions on how to create a culture that speaks up when issues arise.



W-11, Modern Day Social Work Ethics, Part Two


June Fisher, LSW, Dynamic Training Solutions

Attend one or both parts of this two-part workshop to review the significant updates to the NASW Code of Ethics. In both sessions you will practice responding to ethical situations. Part One will review ethical situations that may arise between administrators, supervisors, staff and other providers/county agencies. Part Two will review situations that may occur related to using technology in the workplace. Both sessions are appropriate for all levels of staff (direct service, supervisor and administrator). Both sessions are eligible for NASW Ethics CEUs.



W-12, Teen Technology Usage Trends and Mental Health Sharing through Social Media, Part Two


Ryan Klingensmith, Founder, Shape the Sky

Life for a teenager is vastly different than it was ten years ago. Kids today have unlimited access to information, apps and websites that can be wonderfully helpful, but also lead to concerning behaviors if adults don’t have the knowledge to teach young people how to behave responsibly in this new cyberplayground. Kids have the knowledge to use technology, but sometimes lack the wisdom to use it responsibly. Adults have the wisdom to be responsible users, but sometimes lack the knowledge to use technology. My goal is to connect knowledge with wisdom. Attendees will learn about popular teen apps and social platforms, including some that are hidden from adults, cyberbullying, oversharing, and other behavior concerns, and effective intervention/prevention practices when working with youth.



T-1, Impact of Supervision and Management on Casework Retention


Bonnie Christian Marsh, Dr. Yoon Mi Kim
George Kovarie, Kutztown University

This presentation will provide mixed methods research findings from a survey of public child welfare caseworkers in Pennsylvania. The research findings suggest that supervisor support and satisfaction with management are positively related to worker retention. Low satisfaction in salary, benefit, and workload (i.e., caseload, paperwork, computer work) had a significant and negative impact on worker retention. The presenters will provide workforce trends in private and public child welfare agencies including: previous staff assessments (2010-2014 time studies & exit surveys); the effects of turnover on client outcomes and agency resources and public perceptions of staff who serve families in child protective services. Implications and directions for public policy, resources, and better outcomes for workforce recruitment and retention will be discussed.



T-2, Collaborating Around New and Innovative Programming… It Takes a Village to Develop Programs


Terri Spiegel Tolomeo, BA, Associate Director BRIDGES Program, Independent Living Services, The Girls’ Center
Cecilia Keesey, BA, Associate Director, Prevention Programming, Children’s Home of York

Collaboration and creative “outside of the box” thinking are two components of program development that have become increasingly necessary in the changing treatment environment. This workshop will share the experiences that the Children’s Home of York encountered while developing two new diverse services. Children’s Home of York’s RISE Program and Integrated Practice Team (IPT), are newly developed and implemented programs that promote trauma informed treatment, collaboration of community providers, and innovative ideas that promote the health and well-being of children, youth and families. The Directors of these programs will share their experiences, from the initial idea stage through program opening, focusing on what worked, what did not work, the importance of collaboration (and all of its dynamics), and what we learned through the process. The Integrated Practice Team (IPT) is based on a model that has been utilized in the Children and Youth system in Jacksonville, Florida for the past decade. Jacksonville has had great success in keeping children with their families and reducing the number of children going into placement. The RISE Program (Reaching Independence through Support and Experience), developed in conjunction with York County, is designed to provide a high level of structure and 24-hour supervision with a 2-1 staffing ratio that also allows for the youth to be engaged in community-based therapeutic services and build the skills necessary to successfully live independently.



T-3, Tobacco Use, Vaping and Youth: A Look at Tobacco/Cannabis Vaping Trends


David Fialko, Certified Prevention Specialist/Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist, The Council of Southeast PA, Inc.

This presentation will explore the current trend of Vaping and the various Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) that are currently popular across the ages. Traditional tobacco products and their permanence on the market will also be explored. Discussions will include the effects of nicotine on the developing brain, learning and the associated costs that schools absorb. Cross utilization of ENDS devices for cannabis products will also be discussed as well as difficulties with policy and procedures regarding use/enforcement of these devices. Conference Workshop Descriptions



T-4, Autism and the Child Welfare System


Kate Hooven, Justice System Consultant, ASERT Autism

ASERT Autism has a profound effect not only on the individuals with autism but also on their families, government agencies, the educational system, the healthcare system, and beyond. Raising awareness and providing tools and strategies for these various agencies will increase the chances for a better outcome for children diagnosed with autism. ASERT Staff and Kate Hooven will share information and videos to present data on individuals in PA living with autism as well as provide an introduction to what a diagnosis of autism means and how such a diagnosis will impact your role as a professional. This workshop will also give an overview of Act 62, Pennsylvania’s Autism Insurance mandate. The workshop will cover Act 62’s implementation, how the law affects the way autism services are paid for in Pennsylvania, and includes details about how this can affect providers and families. Also included is information about how and when private insurers are mandated to pay for ABA services in school settings.



T-5, Strategic Partnerships: Alliances, Mergers, Backshop Contracting, Affliations – What’s Right for Your Organization?


Michael Kellerman, President & CEO, The Village, Moderator
Jay Deppeler, Inperium, Inc., Carl E. Clark, II,President & CEO, Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health
Nancy Kukovich, President & CEO, Adelphoi

In recent years, there has been an increase in alliances, mergers, outsourcing and affiliations among human services providers. These arrangements can benefit all parties by creating efficiencies, expanding services, and ensuring financial support to advance critical missions. Learn from organizations that are pursuing these opportunities with other organizations and find out whether affiliation, outsourcing or another arrangement may make sense for your organization.



T-6, Considerations for our Workforce: Chronic Organizational Trauma and Email Overload


Lisa Lowrie, Director of Advocacy and Consumer Relations, The Bradley Center
Amy Freeman, Director of Health and Wellness, East Stroudsburg University
Dr. Alex Redcay, Executive Director, Serise, Inc.

This workshop is designed to introduce leaders to two areas that may impact organizational health; Email overload and Chronic Organizational Trauma. Email overload, characterized as volume, invasion, and rapid response expectation, has been shown to cause stress and burnout in workers. Chronic Organizational Trauma (COT) is a prolonged state of organizational dysfunction and chaos marked by ineffective responses and the inability to effectively manage agency operations. COT is conceptualized across three levels: (1) individual trauma history of employees and supervisors, (2) quality of work environment, and (3) sudden policy change and financial uncertainty. Hear what research has shown about these areas and learn what this might mean for your agency.



T-7, Drug Trends Among Today’s Youth


Matthew Null, Gaudenzia

Today’s students are not just drinking beer and smoking a little weed. Are you aware of what waxing, boofing, and robotripping are? If you see writing on the bathroom stall from a student looking for Molly, they are not looking for a girl named Molly. If you were a student looking for drugs where would you try to get them? Do you know how the clothes kids wear can relate to drug use? This session will share critical information that human service professionals need to know about drug use trends among youth, including the latest on opiates, marijuana, hallucinogens, Kratom, cannabinoids (Spice, K2), cathinones (bath salts), the role of the Internet, health effects, warning signs, and prevention strategies.



T-8, Using Virginia Satir’s Self-Esteem Maintenance Toolkit for Self-Care, Client Care, and Clinical Supervision, Part One


Caren L. Rosser-Morris, Ph.D, Clinical Psychologist, Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (OMHSAS) Children’s Bureau

Learn how to use Virginia Satir’s “Self-Esteem Maintenance ToolKit” for self-care and know when and how to share these strengths-based tools with others who are struggling to accept, understand and grow themselves. After participating in this workshop, attendees will understand why the maintenance of self-esteem is important to the promotion of resiliency, both in ourselves and in our work with others in the field, learn to apply several tools in the Virginia Satir Self-Esteem Maintenance Toolkit, and describe some effective communication and coaching strategies they can use to support self-esteem maintenance and resiliency in others.



T-9, A World of Opportunities: Functional Leadership in Therapeutic Milieu


Dr. Michael W. Gaffley, Associate Professor, Nova Southeastern University

The hierarchical-position-power-status-control-model of leadership does not work well in a decentralized interactive-intensive context. Recent research of Not-for-profit organizations reveal an IQ of 91. IQ in this study refers to intention to quit. The comfort of dysfunction makes leaders fear the uncertainty of change. This workshop will promote leader-member-exchange, professional learning communities, reflective practice, EQ and courageous conversations.



T-10, Value-Based Purchasing: What Providers Need to Know and Do Today


Lynn Kovich, Deputy Secretary, Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (OMHSAS)
Amanda Roth, Acting Director for Bureau of Quality Management and Data Review, OMHSAS
Sally Kovich, Office of Medical Assistance Programs (OMAP)

Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) reimburses provider networks based upon the value of the services they provide – defined as a measurement of outcomes against the cost of delivering those outcomes. While the concept is simple, VBP implementation is complex, with many moving parts. Hear from industry leaders on the state of VBP implementation in Pennsylvania, the models of VBP, contract changes and distribution of risk, working with your Behavioral Health Managed Care Organizations (BHMCOs) and more.



T-11, Early Childhood Wellness Initiative: Teaching Parenting Skills Through Observation for Caregivers of Very Young Children


Shari Hutchison, Project Director
Amanda Ayers Maise, Manager of Special Projects, Community Care Behavioral Health

This outcome-focused presentation will describe the Early Childhood Wellness Initiative, an intervention delivered by a master’s and bachelor’s level home-based therapy team focused on the transfer of parenting skills through observation. This model is designed to strengthen the caregiver-child relationship and improve behavior for children ages 3-8 years. A behavioral health managed care organization provides implementation support and management of data used to inform successes and challenges of the program. Currently, about one third of families are reaching graduation while an additional third of families are transitioned into a different behavioral health service that may be a better match for the child. Caregiver report of the therapeutic alliance is positive, and outcome data demonstrate substantial improvements in child behaviors and therapist ratings of caregiver interaction for families graduating from the program. The development and implementation of this parenting skills model has helped to address challenges with underutilization of services and has demonstrated improved outcomes for very young children with disruptive behaviors.



T-12, Using Virginia Satir’s Self-Esteem Maintenance Toolkit for Self-Care, Client Care, and Clinical Supervision, Part Two


Caren L. Rosser-Morris, Ph.D, Clinical Psychologist, Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (OMHSAS) Children’s Bureau

Learn how to use Virginia Satir’s “Self-Esteem Maintenance ToolKit” for self-care and know when and how to share these strengths-based tools with others who are struggling to accept, understand and grow themselves. After participating in this workshop, attendees will understand why the maintenance of self-esteem is important to the promotion of resiliency, both in ourselves and in our work with others in the field, learn to apply several tools in the Virginia Satir Self-Esteem Maintenance Toolkit, and describe some effective communication and coaching strategies they can use to support self-esteem maintenance and resiliency in others.